More about the pub

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A Restoration era pub

Built in the reign of King Charles II in 1681, timbers from an old wooden sailing vessel were used in the construction, giving the pub its name. These exposed beams can still be seen in the Old Bar today.

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On the Pilgrim's Trail

The Pilgrims’ Trail, connecting Winchester Cathedral with Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy, crosses the village, which was itself originally part of the Bishopric of Winchester. The Monarch’s Way and South Downs way also pass close by. And we welcome horse riders and cyclists. We even have a sizeable horse pen in the gardens. (Thanks to Ramblers.org.uk for the photo, from 19.)

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The Old Bar

Enjoy the open log fire, a game of darts, the tall tales of the village cricket team and other local gossip in the Old Bar. Dogs are served first.

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The kitchen

Chef Philip Brown has pub kitchens in his DNA and knows how to create a distinctive offering to cater for all tastes.


He began his carrier working in small pub kitchens in his home county of Devon, and later took a job at the Oakley Court Hotel in Windsor, a two-Rosette kitchen. He was Head Chef at The Royal Oak in Cheltenham, lifting the kitchen, and the pub, from obscurity to somewhere renowned across the county for its food.

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Classic comfort food and exceptional dishes

Phil's current position as Head Chef of The Ship Inn is the culmination of fifteen years of menu refining, flavour combinations and taste tests, to bring you a menu combining classic comfort food and exceptional dishes designed to impress - bringing a taste of fine dining to your pub dinner in this traditional setting.